2016 Top Coursing Dogs - 2016 CKC Official Results

2016 Top Pointing Dogs - 2016 CKC Official Results

2016 Top Retrievers  - 2016 CKC Official Results

2016 Top Field Spaniels  - 2016 CKC Official Results

We asked the owners of the Subaru Top Field Dogs to tell us their most memorable moments. Here are their answers:
 
2016TFDCoursing-Image.jpg#1 Lure Coursing Dog
Devonair’s Xiara FChX
Whippet
Owners: Don & Anne Hulley
 
How long have you been participating in lure coursing? We entered our first lure coursing trial in October 1991, hosted by the Ontario Lure Coursing Association.
 
List other events you participate in with your dogs. Over the years of enjoying Whippets, I have participated in obedience trials. I trained my first Whippet to the Utility level and have put obedience titles on six Whippets. I have also participated in flyball, putting titles on four Whippets – the highest title being an Onyx award (20,000 lifetime points). I have also done some non-competitive agility training, just for fun and to keep my dogs stimulated. Although Whippets are not known to be enthusiastic swimmers, all three of my current Whippets, including Xiara, love swimming. We take them to ponds, quarries and a dock-diving pool as often as we can in the warm months.
 
Most memorable win/field event in 2016? While we enjoyed every one of Xiara’s wins in 2016, we were most happy to just watch her doing what she loves best!
 
What is your dog’s greatest strength in the field? Xiara has the right combination of speed, agility, endurance, follow and enthusiasm to get the top scores.
 
What was the most challenging aspect of preparing your dog for field events? The most challenging aspect of preparing Xiara for lure coursing trials is keeping her fit. It is very challenging to find areas where I can safely and legally let her run full out, which I believe she needs to keep fit for lure coursing. I make it a priority to provide her the opportunity to free run every day, as well as as much leash walking as I can fit into my schedule.
 
What do you like most about competing in field events? There are many things I love about lure coursing! There is no better feeling than the thrill of seeing your hound run full out chasing the ‘bunny,’ as they love and were bred to do. It’s such a natural thing for them – no training other than keeping them fit. Also, we love our coursing ‘family’ – our breeders, Heather, Everett and Heather-Jean Dansereau – who have become lifelong good friends. We have met like-minded sighthound people all over Canada and the U.S. For the most part lure coursing people are not as competitive as some of the other sports. While we love nothing more than seeing our hounds run well, we can equally enjoy cheering on our friends’ hounds. Camping on the field and the post-coursing potluck dinners are the best!
 
Advice you would give someone new to lure coursing events? I’d love to see more owners keep their sighthounds fit and bring them out to try something they’ll love. It’s not a huge time commitment and not as expensive as some of the dog sports. Come to the trials, talk to people, make some friends, enjoy a day outdoors, and be amazed by the athletic running hounds. Don’t worry about points, ribbons and winning. That’s not important to the dogs at all… just icing on the cake for the proud owners.

 
2016TFD_OpenPointing.PNG#1 Amateur and Open Shooting Pointing Dog
FTCh. & AFTCh. Fastforwards BK Gunner
Pointer
Owner/Handler: Sérgio Velez
 
How long have you been training dogs? I have been around hunting/bird dogs for as long as I can remember. My Dad always had and trained his own bird dogs for hunting back in Portugal. Training bird dogs has always been a part of my life but only for the past 12 years have I been involved in competing at field trials.
 
List other events you participate in with your dogs. Hunting and field trialling have been the only events that I’ve been involved in.
 
Most memorable win/field event in 2016? The most memorable moment was to be the Runner-Up Champion with Gunner at the CKC National Amateur Shooting Dog Championship. This particular event gathered a number of very competitive Amateur Field Trial Clubs of America dogs, all eager to get the champion belt buckle. Gunner was the youngest dog amongst the competition and one of the very few that had never run on those grounds. For not having any expectations, Runner-Up Champion was a very memorable moment to me.
 
What is your dog’s greatest strength in the field? There’s a number of things that are needed to be put together in order to make a dog of his calibre – style, brains, eagerness to please me,
drive and endurance.
 
What was the most challenging aspect of preparing your dog for field events? Most definitely, grounds. It is a challenge to have a number of large locations for training on wild birds and to create endurance. I’m afraid that it is the biggest challenge of field trialling these days.
 
What do you like most about competing in field events? To watch every single dog from the back of my horse.
 
Advice you would give someone new to pointing field events? Rain or sunshine, put in the dedication. Join a local Pointing Dog Club and get a thick skin.

 
Retrieving-Image.jpg#1 Combined All-Age Retriever
FTCh. & AFTCh. Pekiskos Bow River Littlerocks
Labrador Retriever
Owners: Laura Jones & Daniel Danforth (handler)
 
How long have you been training dogs? We have been training dogs for over 20 years. We have been very focused on being competitive in Retriever Field Trials since 2010.
 
List other events you participate in with your dogs. Just retriever training.
 
Most memorable win/field event in 2016? Our most memorable event in 2016 was when Pebbles won both All-Age Stakes at the BC Amateur Field Trial Club’s field trial in Logan Lake, BC, earning a “Double Header” and being the proud recipient of the Al McKean award.
 
What is your dog’s greatest strength in the field? Pebbles’ greatest strength is her water work, especially water blinds.
 
What was the most challenging aspect of preparing your dog for field events? At the All-Age level, it is challenging to keep their skills balanced so they can perform well at every trial: water and land work, running marks and blinds, long distances and short distances.
 
What do you like most about competing in field events? We love working as a team with our retrievers. We both love the retriever sport and get to spend our time together, training and competing with the dogs. Training retrievers allows us to be outdoors, to travel to many places to compete and be a part of the retriever community filled with great people and amazing canine athletes.
 
Advice you would give someone new to retrieving field events? Make sure your retriever has proper Basics training, which gives us the tools to train and handle our dogs. Without a solid foundation, your dog will never reach his/her full potential. Educate yourself on sound training methods. Become a student of the sport of retrievers: go to field trials and observe handlers, find a mentor to guide you through your training, and attend workshops. Get a dog bred to do the work: seek out a retriever with field pedigree.

 
Open-Spaniel-Image.jpg#1 Open All-Age Spaniel
Flushingwing Black Magic
English Springer Spaniel
Owner/Handler: John Mitchell
 
How long have you been training dogs? About 27 years. During this time, I have earned High Point Dog in Canada six times with my homebred Springers. I have also won two Nationals – Canada’s top event for Spaniels – and been runnerup twice.
 
List other events you participate in with your dogs. Just field trialling and hunting. Of course, basic obedience training is a must as a foundation for fieldwork.
 
Most memorable win/field event in 2016? The most memorable weekend was in the spring of 2016 when Flushingwing Black Magic earned back-to-back wins.
 
What is your dog’s greatest strength in the field? He has it all… a strong drive on birds, steady on the flush, retrieves to hand, follows hand signals and is good in the water. He knows his job!
 
What was the most challenging aspect of preparing your dog for field events? Preparation is a neverending process. I train a lot of dogs, and have to handle a lot of different personalities. They must all be trained to the same ability. It is important to know what pressures you can put on each dog and decide when they are ready to trial. It is crucial to do your homework on each dog. If there are any holes in your dog’s training, the judges will find them.
 
What do you like most about competing in field events? One of the most rewarding aspects of participating in field events is the joy of watching the dogs work; doing what they were bred to do. I also enjoy being a part of a ‘community’ that shares a common goal. No one is going to win all the time, but we all are just as happy when someone else wins. If you put in the work to train and prepare your dog, you will succeed.
 
Advice you would give someone new to spaniel field events? First and foremost, do your homework and go to a reputable breeder. For field work, you will need to find a biddable dog – a dog with the right personality, from healthy, sound bloodlines. Then find a great training partner – or group of enthusiasts – to help guide you through the training and trialling process. A good mentor is invaluable. Dr. Dave McCurdy, a legend in English Springers, became a lifelong friend and mentor not only to me but also to many breed and field enthusiasts, as well.


Amateur-Spaniel-Image.jpg#1 Amateur All-Age Spaniel
Tuffy Of Ivanhoe
English Springer Spaniel
Owner/Handler: Bill Cosgrove
 
How long have you been training dogs? I trace my involvement back to my son’s first birthday. That day in June (Father's Day), he surprised me with a Springer pup, which got me started in the world of field trialling. Oh, my son Ben is 36… so it's been a while.
 
List other events you participate in with your dogs. I casually hunt with my dogs. Early on I hunted more, but as game diminished in our area, I found trialling dogs to be a great joy and excuse to turn my seasonal interest into a year-round pursuit.
 
Most memorable win/field event in 2016? My most memorable event was the Canadian National Amateur Championship. Hailing from the states, I always enjoy getting up to the Canadian countryside and have made some great friendships there through the years. My dogs performed well – particularly Tuffy, who garnered a second.
 
What is your dog’s greatest strength in the field? When we talk about the really exceptional dogs running trials, they pretty much have to be "a complete dog." That said, they will also have perhaps one area where they really excel that might distance themselves from the pack. In Tuffy's case, it would be her incredible nose, which leads to strong, positive, finds that even WOW me!
 
What was the most challenging aspect of preparing your dog for field events? If you want to be competitive, field trialling is a commitment. I have always enjoyed the competition. Each of my dogs will have an area that we are developing more fully. It varies from dog to dog. You might think of it as a balancing act where you want to see an exciting field dog working with a level head and under control. I would describe my methodology as always cycling in and out of striving for a peak performance followed by a cooling-off period.
 
What do you like most about competing in field events? In terms of what I like most about field trialling dogs, in retrospect I would have to say it has been living my adult life out doors, pursuing something that is always a little out of reach, making friends and enjoying the unique companionship that canines provide.
 
Advice you would give someone new to spaniel field events? My advice to newbies would be to acquire the most well bred dog you can find, and don't haggle over the price. Think about it terms of spreading the investment out over the next 13 years of your life. Develop your dog slowly, avoiding manmade problems wherever possible. There are some very good resources out there. I think one of the best is Gerry Babin’s step-by-step e-book. Don't become a ‘weekend warrior’ where you only interact with your dog on the weekend and inadvertently engage in overtraining. Try to get involved with people who share your interest – a club would be your best bet. Finally enjoy the beauty and wonderment of the outdoors.

 
 
 
 

 
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