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2018 Top Field Dogs

2018 Top Pointing Dogs - 2018 CKC Official Results

2018 Top Retrievers  - 2018 CKC Official Results


2018 Top Field Spaniels  - 2018 CKC Official Results
 
2018 Top Field Beagles - 2018 CKC Official Results
 
2018 Top Coursing Dogs - 2018 CKC Official Results
 
The CKC would like to congratulate all of its field competitors – retrievers, spaniels, pointers, lure coursers and Beagles. Among the oldest of dog sports, enthusiasts spend endless hours in the field watching in awe as their dogs do what they were bred to do. This year we have a fresh slate of Top Dog owners who will share their experiences and tips for bringing out their dogs’ natural hunting abilities. 
 
We had a chat with the TOP DOGS in each field event, who shed some light on their most memorable victories and tips – here are their interviews:
 

#1 Open Shooting Pointing Dog – DC Kinwashky Wee Johnny D


Pointing-Open-Shooting-Dog.jpgCall name: ‘Johnny’
Brittany Spaniel
Owner/Handler: Tom Doherty
 

How did you first become involved in field trials? 
I bought my first Brittany from Red Diamond in Alberta. With the breeders’ help and encouragement, I became involved with local pointing clubs. I was impressed that so many people were willing to help and share their years of experience and knowledge.
 
What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
Be positive. Training should be fun not only for the trainer but the dog as well. Remember every dog is different and waiting for maturity before training for the polished finished dog would be wise.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
Everyone has had a major setback in their training! If they didn’t, it wouldn’t be called training. When a setback occurs, we go back to what the dog knows, and then slowly work our way back to the misstep. Sometimes you must take one step back, to move forward two.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
I had a lot of memorable moments in 2018. However, my most memorable moment ever was with a dog that shattered her leg while out running. The prognoses were amputation or euthanasia of which we decided neither. She went on to have surgery and a lengthy rehabilitation. We received a lot of support from our friends and clubs, and we all cried as she came back after that to win several trials.
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
Research the breed you want to ensure that the dog comes from a background that interests you the most. Join a club even before you buy a pup, as many members can help with your search and training. Rely on your breeder to inform and advise you of where to start. Have fun with your dog.


 

#1 Amateur Shooting Pointing Dog – WindRip's Turn It Loud FDJ


Pointing-Amateur-Shooting-Dog-edited.jpgCall name: ‘Maysa’
German Shorthaired Pointer
Breeder/Owner/Handler: Arwen Dabb
 

How did you first become involved in field trials? 
My family has had GSPs since I was a kid. We hunted with them and I always wanted to do field trials. What could be more fun than horses and dogs! I started out in field tests. When my young dog won the second derby we entered, I realized I preferred the competitive aspect of trials and was hooked.
 
What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
You and your dog should both be having fun. Too much pressure can ruin a young dog. Keep your training sessions short and be consistent. If you are having trouble with something, go back to the basics and make sure that your dog understands what you are asking it to do.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
There are so many unexpected things that can happen in the field. I try to evaluate what went wrong, and then train for that at home if I can.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
Going from #1 Puppy in 2017 to #1 Amateur is a big leap for a young dog. I was thrilled that Maysa won several stakes. Our best moment was a win that qualified her to compete at the GSPCA National Field Trial last year.
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
It is important to watch a different dogs and braces. Go to lots of events (tests and trials) and walk or ride the braces. Ask questions of the people around you if you can, and find someone to train with, or someone that can mentor you. Don't take what you read on social media to heart. I find that the people who are talking the most are often the ones with the least experience or knowledge to back it up.


 

#1 Combined All-Age Retriever – FTCh. & AFTCh. Pekiskos Bow River Littlerocks QFTR


Retrieving-1-Combined-edited.jpgCall name: ‘Pebbles’
Labrador Retriever
Owners: Laura & Dan Danforth
Handler: Dan Danforth
 

How did you first become involved in field trials? 
We started in retriever hunt tests with our first dogs in the mid-1990s. We soon became involved in field trials. We have been very committed to being competitive in field trials since 2010.
 
What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
Always be consistent in your training and maintain standards.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
Nothing major. We constantly work to keep Pebble’s skills balanced so she can perform well at every trial: water and land work, running marks and blinds, long distances and short distances.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
Our most memorable moment in 2018 happened on the weekend Pebbles earned a double header, winning both days. On the final retrieve of the fourth series water marks on the second trial, Pebbles completed a very long shoreline swim to the bird. It was a wonderful display of her athleticism, courage, discipline and marking ability. It is always a thrill to watch Pebbles and Dan’s teamwork.
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
Make sure your retriever has proper basic training. This will give you the tools to train and handle your dogs. Without a solid foundation, your dog will never reach his/her full potential. Educate yourself on sound training methods. Become a student of the sport of retrievers: go to field trials and observe handlers, find a mentor to guide you through your training, and attend workshops. Get a dog bred to do the work: seek out a retriever with field pedigree.
 

 

#1 Open All-Age Spaniel – FTCh. Hearthrock's Mayhem


Spaniel-Open-All-Age-2-1.JPGCall name: ‘May’
English Springer Spaniel
Owner/Handler: Cindy Trudel

 
How did you first become involved in field trials? 
I bought a field spaniel for my husband in 1998. Twister was already trained for field trials. My husband joined the sport and was gone most weekends. In 2005, he asked me whether I wanted my own dog so we could spend more time together. I ‘borrowed’ a retired field champion from John Mitchell, who taught me the ropes. In our first competition, Fire and I won a fourth and I was hooked!
 
What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
Make sure you change your exercises so that the dog doesn’t do the exercises by rote. Things in the field are never the same as in training, and a dog must be able to use its head to adapt.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
Everyone has setbacks. First, you must figure out, “What did I do differently (wrong)?” It is never the dog’s fault. Take a step back to when things were working and move forward again, step by step, until the problem is resolved. There are no quick fixes. Ask for advice and be patient. It will take time, but you will get it corrected eventually.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
Our most memorable moment was May’s win in the spring of 2018, which finished her FTCh. She and I were so in tune that day – amazing!
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
Trust your dog! There are lots of different training methods, and everyone has their way, so find the way that makes sense to you, and then you will be successful. Continually learn from others, but take their advice with a grain of salt. Surround yourself with people who will support you, your training methods and your love of dogs!
 

 

#1 Amateur All-Age Spaniel – AFTCh. Spurvalley Vesper's Gabriel


Spaniel-Amateur-All-Age.jpgCall name: ‘Gabriel’
English Springer Spaniel
Breeder/Owner/Handler: Greg Royer
 

How did you first become involved in field trials? 
I grew up on a farm in Alberta and spent many fall days pheasant hunting. When I was 15, a family friend gave me an English Springer. I promised myself that when I had the means to own and train my own springer I would. After college I bought my first Springer and began to train with the Calgary springer club. It didn’t take long for the club members to introduce me to the sport of spaniel field trials.
 
What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
I’ve been training for over 20 years. I would start with patience and perseverance. Dogs have good days and bad days. Never let the bad days discourage you. Use your imagination to overcome the small issues and keep your training sessions fun. If the training session is not going well, know when to stop.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
Every trainer has had setbacks. The more dogs you train the more setbacks your going to have. Each dog is different. I find that sometimes you just have to use your imagination to fix small issues, have lots patience and be willing to reassess.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
Winning the Canadian Amateur High Point Spaniel. It allowed to me scratch off another milestone.
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
Do your research before buying your puppy. Understand what you want from your dog, research different breeds and talk to as many people in the field as possible. Search out your local field trial club, introduce yourself and ask as questions. You’ll find that most people are more than willing to help. You’ll end up with a great young dog and new friends enjoying the same hobbies as you do.
 

#1 13” Field Beagle – FTCh. Watermans Hard Hitting Holly


Beagle.PNGCall name: ‘Holly’
Owners/Handlers: Tanya & Dana Stone

How did you first become involved in field trials? 
My brother trialed when I was young, and that’s when I got interested.
 
What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
Have lots of patience.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
Haven't really had any setbacks that I can remember.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
I really enjoyed the Fundy trial where our dogs placed first with Holly, third with ‘Pepper’ and fourth with ‘Kate.’
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
Always make time for your dogs and get to know what you like and want in your dogs.

 

#1 Lure Coursing Dog – Ch. Devonair's Wind in the Willows FChX


Lure-Coursing-1.jpgCall name: ‘Willow’
Whippet
Breeders/Owners/Handlers: Everett & Heather Dansereau

 
How did you first become involved in field trials? 
In 1978 I was attending a dog show with my two Whippets, and there was a lure-coursing demo taking place. As soon as the Whippets saw the lure moving around the field they went ballistic. I knew that was the activity for them. My husband Everett and I joined the fledgling Capital Sighthound Association and then became founding members of the Quebec Lure Coursing Association.
 

What do you think is the most important thing to remember when training for the field?
Coursing the artificial lure comes naturally to most sighthounds, so there is very little training involved. When I have a litter of pups, I tease them with a tiny lure on a string to help bring out their natural chase instinct. When they are a bit older they are exposed to the actual field-trial environment from the sidelines. They should be introduced to the lure moving in a short straight distance, with corners being introduced gradually. Do not run your dog with another one until s/he is totally focused on the lure.
 
Have you ever had a major setback or misstep, and if so, how did you work through it?
There have been disappointments when I think my dog had a great run and the judges think otherwise, but this is an activity we do for fun.
 
What was your most memorable moment in 2018?
Attending Crufts and seeing so many nice Whippets in their country of origin was a once-in-a-lifetime event for me.
 
If you were to give advice to someone new to the sport, what have you found to be the most important place to start?
Read the CKC rule book and volunteer to help at a trial. Every club treasures their members and are willing to mentor new people and their dogs. Remember that the dogs just want to have fun and every dog goes home a winner in its owner’s heart.

 

 

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