Get In Touch

Entrer en contact

General

Général

mailinformation@ckc.ca Telephone 416-675-5511 TelephoneToll-Free 1-855-364-7252 location 5397 Eglinton Avenue W.
Suite 101
Etobicoke, ON
M9C 5K6
hoursMonday - Friday
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. EST We're open right now! Nous sommes ouverts!

Membership Plus Toll Free

Adhésion Plus – sans frais

Order Desk

Bureau des commandes

Your Club is Here to Help!

Besoin d’aide? Le Club est à votre disposition.

If you’ve lost registration paperwork or certificates due to circumstances out of your control (fires, floods, etc.), please reach out to us using one of the above methods and we can help replace your important documents.

How to Support Purebred Dogs in Your Day-to-Day Life

December 11, 2023

Ways to connect in order to educate the public and protect our dogs

It's not always easy being an advocate for purebred dogs. It often seems like an uphill struggle with the constant influx of "designer breeds", for-profit animal rescue organizations, and ignorant media outlets painting all breeders with the same brush. I believe that, in order to get our message out, we must be constantly promoting the fantastic qualities of purebred dogs and doing so in a kind, informative way.

It's hard to get a purebred dog into a pet home before a "doodle" breeder does. I could go on this topic for days. Poodle mixes are produced en masse. Anyone with a couple thousand dollars (yes, they cost as much as our carefully planned, health tested, pedigreed pups) and a computer can find one to buy today. Probably several if the funds allowed, and there are really no wait times as every region seems to have several businesses selling them. And, if one didn’t want to go looking for them, “doodle” breeders are now even taking Google ads in emails you didn’t subscribe to, but have to forcibly delete.  

One of the dogs that I own is a Standard Poodle. She's a retired show dog and gorgeous girl at 12 years young. I keep her coat clean at all times, and she's kept in a clip called the "German-clip". It's a popular, sporty pet trim for Poodles. Although Poodles have been consistently in the Canadian Kennel Club's Top Ten Most Popular Dog breeds for over half a century, I get stopped by strangers and told that they have "never seen a Poodle in real life". Of course, my thought at the first encounter of this type was "are you kidding me?", but upon reflection, there could be a good chance that someone in their 20s is being honest with that statement.

Whenever I meet someone who hasn't met a real Poodle before, I encourage them to pet her and experience her sweet personality. I use this time to kindly tell them some facts about Poodles, like that they are one of the most intelligent dog breeds who are still used as water retrievers around the world, that they come in three different sizes, and that you can clip their coats in all sorts of different ways, even the "teddy bear clip" ever so popular with doodles.

I always make time to have a little chat with anyone who wants to talk about my dogs. I would recommend having a few facts about your breed ready to go whenever you interact with members of the public. React kindly and, if possible, with humour to any preconceived notions they might have about your breed. People always tell me that they thought Poodles were mean. I always ask "is that because they are the villains in cartoons?". 100% of the time they say "yes" and we have a little laugh. Give time as well to see if they have any questions about the breed as well. You never know which seeds you are planting.


We must also be willing to talk to the public at events like shows, trials and especially at events like "Meet the Breeds", which CKC members put on across the country, throughout the year. We have to remember that when we are bringing our dogs out and inviting the public to meet them, we might get met with strange questions and incorrect statements. Last year, I was at the inaugural CKC Meet the Breeds at the Royal Agricultural Winter fair in Toronto. The time slot was for Bulldogs and a breeder brought some fantastic adult dogs and two adorable puppies. Of course, the crowd was delighted. A man walked up with his children and stated that "all Bulldogs are sick". I took a deep breath and before I could respond, the dog's breeder calmly explained the difference between a backyard breeder and an ethical preservation breeder as well as what health tests she does before breeding and how screening breeding stock results in healthy, happy Bulldogs. The man and his family thanked her for the information and left knowing much more than they did 10 minutes prior. It's crucial that the public sees us at our events as well as out in public and that we take time to chat with them. I would much rather the public get information on our purebred dogs from us than from another source. Wouldn't you?

Never underestimate the power of a quick conversation or a compliment with a fellow dog owner. It's not unusual for me to stop my car, jump out and ask someone walking where they got that "gorgeous Berger Picard" from. Not everyone is as outgoing as I am, but it does pay to get excited about purebred dogs and build community. Even with owners of non-purebred dogs, I compliment good manners. There's a "Pitbull" mix in my area who used to be very reactive on leash to my dogs when we crossed paths. The owners now keep treats on hand and have taught the dog to peacefully focus on them as we pass. I told them yesterday how impressed I was and that I could tell how hard they've worked and how far their dog has come. They were flattered and told me they used the training school my dogs went to! They then had several questions they told me they have been wanting to ask about my dogs.


It is no secret that dog rescue is incredibly popular right now. "This is my rescue", proud owners will say. "Does he have a name or is it Rescue"? I'll ask as a joke. Money seeking, for-profit rescues have attempted to turn those who purchase dogs for rehoming (rescue) against those who purchase purebred puppies from responsible breeders against one another. That being said, I'm happy to announce that, in my personal experience, not for profit animal rescues understand that preservation breeds started and continue the concept of rescue with their breeds and lines. The organizations I'm involved with also agree with me that reputable purebred dog breeds are not the issue and that backyard breeders are the ones responsible for filling the shelters with dogs (especially post-Covid).

I'm so happy I connected with two responsible, Canadian rescue organization that care for Canadian dogs in need. For a long time, I steered clear of rescue organizations worried that they would accuse us purebred dog folks of causing the crowding in their spaces, but I discovered quickly that the two of us (ethical purebred dog enthusiast and ethical dog rescue supporters) want the same things; loving, life-long homes for their dogs. In helping with two organizations, I realized that a good rescue screens like a good breeder to put the right dog in the right home ("aces in their places", as I like to say). I believe it's very important for us purebred dog lovers to be very visible and involved with shelters and organizations whose values and ethics you agree with. Get involved in a shelter food drive, a walk-a-thon, or other event to raise funds and bring your dogs along to invoke conversation. I'm happy to be part of many talks and able to speak up for ethical dog breeders when necessary.

I also personally believe it’s important to be involved in something other than dogs. Join a knitting club, gym, cooking class, or whatever you like. I believe that if people only know purebred dog folks as a group that really just sticks to itself, we will never get our message out there. That way if someone is interested in a purebred puppy, their friend can say “Helen from my choir breeds Pomeranians. I will see if she knows a breeder for you”.

Another battle we face in purebred dogs is the media. Luckily for me, I'm a broadcaster. I have worked in television and radio for the past 15 years and I don't take my platform for granted when it comes to purebred dogs. I talk about my beloved purebred dogs often and was thrilled when I got to work one morning and received a dozen messages from listeners letting me know that, because of me talking about my Dandie Dinmont Terriers, they all got a final "Jeopardy" question right the night before! Apart from telling humorous stories about my dogs, I'm able to share the joys and hard work purebred dog breeders face, inform the public of upcoming events and bring up advocacy issues when necessary. I'm always delighted at how much the listeners enjoy my dog topics. I do a break every Remembrance Day talking about the role purebred dogs had in both World Wars. Listeners love it and, if Remembrance Day falls on a weekend, they request that I talk about the military dogs whenever I get back to the studio. I’m always touched by that and happy to tell the courageous stories of the dogs who served.


Most of us don't have a show where we can promote our love of purebred dogs, but we can reach out to local news sources to let them know we are available to call in or come by the studio and chat whenever a topic arises in need of an expert. We can follow news sources on social media and correct or applaud their stories, depending on the facts they present. We all have our own networks on social media as well. Are you presenting upbeat, informative information about the joys of purebred dogs? Are you hash tagging your breed on in your Instagram posts and tweets? I have no idea what to call the posts on Elon Musk’s “X” platform now. The world shops online now, so showcasing purebred dogs on your social site is a great way to connect with those who might be interested in learning more and maybe eventually owning a purebred dog of their own.

Bit by bit we can continue to spread our love for purebred dogs. Showcase your dogs on your own social channels, reach out to other dog owners in your area, volunteer with dog charities and keep an eye on the media's stories. It’s all about connection.

What else do you do to help promote purebred dogs? Let me know in the comments below!

The opinions expressed by authors on the Canadian Kennel Club Blog and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of the Canadian Kennel Club or any of its employees.

Les opinions et les commentaires exprimés dans le blogue du Club Canin Canadien sont ceux des auteurs et ils ne reflètent pas les opinions du Club Canin Canadien ni de ses employés.

Author InformationInformation sur l’auteur

 Ian Lynch

Ian Lynch


Ian Lynch is a comedian, on-air personality and Canadian Kennel Club member.

Share this ArticlePartagez l’article

 
instagram logo
Comments
Blog post currently doesn't have any comments.
  = one - five (please enter the answer to the question or statement)

Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article > Previous Post >Prochain article >


AccueilHome > Blog > December 2023 > How to Support Purebred Dogs in Your Day-to-Day Life